The challenge of complexity:  Unit pricing, part 5

By Michelle Leung

Unit pricing presents high operational risk, especially when manual processes are involved. The increased complexity of fund-of-funds structures, cross-country assets, multiple valuation points, and increasingly exotic assets, coupled with stricter enforcement of global regulatory compliance, adds to these risks.

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To diminish information gap, FCA changes AIFMD (Reporting) Instrument 2017

By Uma Sheth & Justin Meagher

On 25 January, 2017, the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) made several changes to their handbook. One such change was to CP 16/17 – Alternative Investment Fund Managers Directive (reporting) Instrument 2017.  The change to this instrument closes a significant information gap between the activities and risks incurred by alternative investment fund managers who have a broad presence in the UK.

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An introductory overview of Sharia investments

By Hong Kok Cheong

The importance for all investment managers to understand the rules of Sharia investments has become more apparent. Sharia funds are expected to grow significantly within the next twelve months. Over the past few months, we have introduced a four-blog series to help industry professionals understand Sharia investments. If you missed any of these blogs or want a refresher on the topic, we have gathered them below.

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MENA managers moving away from LP-GP private equity model

By Kamran Anwar

At a recent session during the annual IFC global private equity conference, industry leaders, including SS&C GlobeOp, discussed the fate of the traditional LP-GP private equity model in MENA and the recent growth in technology and venture capitalism (VC) deals in the region.

Below are key highlights discussed during the session:

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SEC and the accredited investors

By Michael Loo

During the Practicing Law Institute’s SEC Speaks in 2016 conference, SEC acting chairman Michael Piwowar shared his thoughts on how the SEC should remove the distinction between accredited and non-accredited investors. Accredited investors can invest in private securities not registered with financial authorities. Under SEC Rule 401 of Regulation D, some of the requirements to be an accredited investor include having an income of $200,000 or having a net worth of $1 million (excluding the primary residence). This naturally targets the alternative investment space, such as hedge funds and private equity funds. Should the distinction between accredited and non-accredited cease to exist, alternative investment managers could have a larger pool of viable investors to tap into.

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A one-stop solution for your data reconciliation needs

By Joe Souza

SS&C’s outsourced reconciliation platform utilizes our best-in-class data integration services (Evare) to feed the industry’s premier reconciliation platform (Recon) with daily exceptions and reporting, all managed by SS&C’s Outsourcing division. This combination creates the most efficient exception management solution possible.

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All systems go! Attending IASA 2017

By Jen Molgano

Amidst 1,000 attendees and key players in the insurance space, we were thrilled to showcase the SS&C booth, catch-up with our clients, and meet new people at IASA 2017. We had an enjoyable, busy three days at the event—hosting a raffle for two tickets to Universal Studios, leading two vendor connect tours, moderating the Chief Investment Officer Roundtable, and kicking off our insurance survey.

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Transparency: How to best serve your investors

By Kamran Anwar

According to Preqin, private equity now manages a record $2.49 trillion, and most of these inflows are institutional. Since private equity now manages a greater percentage share of investors’ portfolios, returns are impacted by performance now more than ever.

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Leveraging predictive models: The right approach for your institution?

By Lauren Smith

Predictive models will have a direct impact on an institution’s ability to support the CECL estimate. Given this, institutions should thoroughly evaluate the costs and benefits of using a modeled versus a non-modeled approach. Predictive models require significant investment, including upfront development and validation as well as ongoing maintenance. However, the benefits of leveraging predictive models include a streamlined reserving process and greater transparency into a potentially volatile estimate.

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